Thursday, November 12, 2009

This just in from the late 1890s














I know it's not the weekend, but was sure this was an appropriately historical photograph.

Meander away.

14 comments:

  1. A little photographic history to go with it:

    http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2009/11/11/style/20091112-tin-slideshow_index.html

    It appears that the 1890s must appear somehow idyllic after all we've gone through recently.

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  2. Fun photograph. Nice idea going back to "tintypes" for ad campaigns. Fits the Ralph Lauren image.

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  3. nice pics - those dudes are sporting some cool duds

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  4. Finally received my copy of Zeitoun. Handsome little book. Anyone interested in joining me in reading it sometime soon?

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  5. Don't know why the blogs are not updated fully, but I've added new material to Vilnius Daze since 4 weeks ago.

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  6. Glad you all enjoyed this photo flash from the past. I really did fall for this one, assuming it was historical. Some of the others are obviously of this era -- in fact some seem downright campy. (Thank goodness puget isn't around to jump all over that comment!)

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  7. In a true Sunday morning meander, it's very overcast and cold here this a.m. but the sun must have peeked through somewhere to the east of the mountains because the snow atop of snowbowl, the local ski hill that I see from my living room, just lit up a bright pink.

    Now it's gone, but nice to know the sun is out there somewhere.

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  8. Hunger in America:

    The number of Americans who lacked reliable access to sufficient food shot up last year to its highest point since the government began surveying in 1995, the Agriculture Department reported on Monday.

    In its annual report on hunger, the department said that 17 million American households, or 14.6 percent of the total, “had difficulty putting enough food on the table at times during the year.” That was an increase from 13 million households, or 11.1 percent, the previous year.

    The results provided a more human sense of the costs of a recession that has officially ended but continues to take a daily toll on households; it describes the plight not of a faceless General Motors or A.I.G. but of families with too little food on their children’s plates.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/17/us/17hunger.html

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  9. An interesting debate on Afghanistan:

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113735039

    There's a link there for the debate as well as a transcript. I found it fascinating -- particularly since Steve Coll argues for staying there.

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  10. This looks like an interesting series. Haven't listened to this one, but might at some point, assuming I can stomach it:

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=97752303

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  11. There's some funny things going on in posting order, throwing Mencken and Ragtime out of order, but I guess as long as the posts get on the screen thats OK.

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  12. There were a couple of floating "drafts" that seemed to throw things out of order. I deleted them.

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  13. If you are particularly bored this p.m., you can listen to the "debates" about whether or not to "debate" the health care bill in the Senate here:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/22886841#22886841

    I'm sure CSpan is also carrying them live.

    I've been listening to bits and pieces of the so-called debate until I can't stand it anymore and then have to hit mute. How in the world did these people get into such positions of power in this country?

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  14. Still posting out of order. Please take note of Jonathan Safran Foer's new book "Eating Animals." I updated the settings so will see if that does any good in the future.

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