Sunday, May 24, 2009

Meander Where you May










A Sunday special...

22 comments:

  1. I'll try to put a meander up each Sunday (or Saturday night).

    Meander where you may, as Teddy would say.....

    ReplyDelete
  2. Cool Pic.It appears you can even see old riverbed towards the upper left.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Glad you like it John. This will be my challenge -- to find a meander each week to encourage discussion.

    Until then, I'm thinking of cracking into Deadwood this weekend to get a better understanding of the Old West -- or what people today think of when they think of the Old West.

    I was sort of confident that this was a good investment until I watched another m/elba highly recommended film (Forgetting Sarah Marshall) and promptly went about rewriting it in my head to make it a highly recommended film. I think I may be getting too old for internet recommendations. Or it may just be a guy thing.

    That, plus my daughter gave me the ultimate warning about Deadwood -- Dad really liked it. But I have it now so I'm going to give it a try......

    ReplyDelete
  4. And for a little bit of trivia tied to today in history -- somewhere in my garage I have a portion of the Roebling silverware. I think it's 1/5 a set -- but enough pieces to set any table for any party I would ever have. (A friend is a great granddaughter and got tired of packing it around).

    ReplyDelete
  5. I meandered away from "War & Peace" last night. Y'all know how I feel about animals and I'm not quite up for the wolf-hunting scene just now.

    So I picked up "Balzac's Horse" by Gert Hofmann. I am so wild about Hofmann's "Lichtenberg and the Little Flower Girl" that I am thinking about writing about the experience of reading that book. Not a critique of the book, mind you, but a record of the sights, sounds and smells connected in my mind with the absorption of Hofmann's crisp prose.

    ReplyDelete
  6. While in Paris, I saw Doris Kearns Goodwin on the Bill Maher show. She was laugh-out-loud funny. I had never suspected her of being so witty.

    But Goodwin told Maher, anent Obama, that all good presidents enjoy the job they are doing. "Did Lincoln enjoy his time in the White House?" asked Maher. This simple question brought Goodwin to a halt and she had to rethink her statement.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Acck! I just saw Bill Maher on a program my husband is watching. Now I realize it was Jon Stewart who was hosting Doris.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Good morning, Chartres. I hope you will start writing -- and let us all know where we can read it. Maybe you should start a Chartres book blog. I'd be a regular there!

    As for Bill Maher et al., I never could keep the three of them straight, preferring to get my news commentary from Matthews and Olbermann.

    For a long time I thought Colbert was Maher when he did the brilliant send up of Bush:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSE_saVX_2A

    This still makes me laugh.

    Now that I've seen Religulous, I watch Maher from time to time, but while I like his politics, he tends to be too sexist and homophobic for my taste -- ironic since he recently had a great interview with Gore Vidal.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Well, that link is only part of Colbert's talk.

    You all have probably seen this, but just in case hopefully this will work (part 1, 2, and 3):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qa-4E8ZDj9s

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOYZF3It848

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAvFM4TYQKU

    ReplyDelete
  10. I've seen Goodwin a couple of times on The Daily Show. She really opens up to having a good time when she is there.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Well, I've given the March about 50 some pages today and I'm not convinced. He's got some great ideas going -- two rebel soldiers disguised as Union men captured by the Union army, a "white Negro" young girl disguised as a white drummer boy but ... it all seems to be sort of sketched in so far. I think I'm going to have to go back to Goodwin.

    ReplyDelete
  12. For what it's worth, both Michiko Kakutani and John Updike had much praise for The March.

    A reminder that I've been working on my blog, http://rick-wordswordswords.blogspot.com/, and I'm finding it almost addicting. It seems almost too easy. I'm also working on a separate blog for my English department.

    ReplyDelete
  13. You know, Rick, I just don't get it. There's definitely a marching forward quality to the narrative but by now the characters should be "real" somehow and so far they seem more like ideas or caricatures. Same problem I had with Ragtime. I may try again but I'm not sure I want to waste anymore time on it. We'll see.

    I think for the most part Kakutani's recommendation is the kiss of death for a book with me -- although her reviews always seem well reasoned.

    Congrats on the blog. It looks great.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Now that I've written that about Doctorow I wonder if that's the difference between best selling fiction and "literary" fiction -- for lack of a better distinction. One is plot driven and the other character driven?

    ReplyDelete
  15. Still waiting on ToR, so I picked up a copy of Jonathan Raban's Old Glory in which he takes a journey on the Mississippi River. I read his Passage to Juneau sometime back, which I enjoyed very much.

    ReplyDelete
  16. And I now have a copy of Nixonland. Never thought in a million years I'd be looking at a book with Nixon on the cover but have to admit this does look good.

    ReplyDelete
  17. But about that @#$%$#^%$&*^% show Deadwood..... what was I thinking? Nice visuals though.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I also bought the first two seasons of Deadwood. Fortunately, they were on sale through amazon.co.uk, as I've had a hard time getting into it as well.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I bought the entire thing, also at a discount. I'm going to stick with it for awhile but not sure it will be an easy commitment to make particularly since the last series I've been watching was Forty Something with Hugh Laurie -- which is more my speed.

    I like Wild Bill, though. And interesting close-up cinematography which is very effective. And loved one of the opening scenes where they show the wagon trains trailing up the hill (from the interstate). If that wasn't the road to Deadwood, they sure found a spot that looked exactly like it.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Interesting though that this is the contemporary idea of "The West." From what I've read, it was nothing at all like that. In comparison, McCabe and Mrs. Miller is probably a lot closer. Or even Paint your Wagon, where they filmed entirely in the rain.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I figure now that I made my way through Lost, Deadwood won't be so hard to do. If nothing else I can enjoy Ian McShane. I have to wonder how much of it, if any, is based on Pete Dexter's book beyond the characters.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Which one is Ian McShane? I must admit, they are all pretty good at what they are doing although the stroking of the mustaches and the sulking of the prostitutes might get old after awhile. Just wish they had a few more words to work with.

    But yes, after the smoke monster (one of the few things I know about Lost) someone who massacres a family on the road to Spearfish and makes it appear to be the work of the Sioux seems pretty mundane.

    ReplyDelete