Thursday, July 24, 2014

Speak up, I can't hear you




In 1878, Thomas Edison augmented the megaphone so that hard-of-hearing persons could pick up vibrations and possibly hear what is being said around them.  He came up with this unusual device, which quickly garnered attention around the world, including New Zealand, where this article stems from.  It sure would be nice to hear from all those looking in ; )

6 comments:

  1. Just finished reading Barry Unsworth's "Sacred Hunger." The book is worthy of a trivia game question: What novel shared the Booker Prize in 1992 with "The English Patient? Trivia question notwithstanding, this is a terrific historical novel about the Atlantic slave trade. Highly recommended.

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  2. I read Middle Passage some years ago,

    http://books.google.lt/books?id=U_zOhNYtOk8C&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

    It was very good as well.

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  3. Never read anything by Charles Johnson, if that is "The Middle Passage" you are referring to. I've gotten too many negative reviews of his writing.

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  4. am currently reading via audio book Jacob & Case's "Treacherous Beauty, Peggy Shippen & Benedict Arnold"

    Shippen (Shippensburg State Univ is named after her family) was every bit the traitor her husband was. Unfortunately she was spared the hanging tree though she well deserved it.

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  5. Sounds like an interesting book. It is amazing how much espionage and treachery was going on at the time,although Benedict Arnold had heroic exploits as well,

    http://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/benedict-arnold

    I guess that's what made him so hard to figure.

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  6. Reading "John Adams" by David McCullough via audio book. Evidently, the Brits planted a couple of spies in his entourage. Very clever of them to do so.

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